WHAT REGENCY WOMEN DID FOR US


68 69 70 71 72 - 73 - 74 75 76 77
Number: 79
Page 73 of 79

WHAT REGENCY WOMEN DID FOR US

RACHEL KNOWLES    Book Number: 87843    Product format: Hardback

The Regency period 1780-1820 was not always an age of romance. There was no system of equal opportunities and women had very few rights. There were huge variations in the amount of education that women received and although allowed to attend lectures at scientific bodies like the Royal Institution, women were debarred from membership. When she married, everything a woman owned became the property of her husband and if she worked, everything she earned was legally his. Women chose to stay with philandering or cruel husbands rather than abandon their children. If a woman was rich, she might choose to stay single, and this way she could also avoid the risk of dying in childbirth, a common fate. All but one of the women featured in this book lived through the entire period, except Jane Austen who died in 1817. She and Maria Edgeworth were both writers from families of the gentry, remained single and loved their homes, but Irish Maria hobnobbed with the rich and famous, whilst Jane led a quiet life in rural Hampshire. Jane Marcet and Caroline Herschel were scientists and both very diffident about their work. Jane was an educational writer from a wealthy Swiss family and wrote the first science textbooks for women and inspired the famous scientist Michael Faraday with her work. Caroline grew up in the German state of Hanover and only became an astronomer to support her brother. She was the first woman to be paid for her services to science. Mary Anning was also a scientist but from a poor, working class background in Dorset. She was one of the first female palaeologists and had to sell the fossils she found in order to pay her bills. Sarah Guppy on the other hand was from a middle-class industrial family in Birmingham and was both an engineer and inventor, and helped produce the design for the Clifton Suspension Bridge in Bristol. Eleanor Coade and Marie Tussaud were both artists and women of business, Eleanor running a successful artificial stone manufactory pieces of which still decorate our heritage landscape, and Marie from humble beginnings in France. She learned the skill of wax modelling against the background of the French Revolution and became one of the most successful entrepreneurs of her day. Sarah Siddons and Harriot Mellon were both actresses, but their lives took very different paths. Harriot attracted the love and respect of Thomas Coutts and her wise management of his fortune secured the future of Coutts Bank. Mary Parminter and Elizabeth Fry were both devout non-conformist Christians and philanthropists, Mary an explorer and mountaineer and Elizabeth Fry recognised for her pioneering work in prisons. 200 years later, the stories of these women are still inspirational. 200 page large softback, eight pages of photos.
Published price: £12.99
Bibliophile price: £6.50


Additional product information

ISBN 9781473882249
Browse these categories as well: Historical Biography, History, Feminism

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68 69 70 71 72 - 73 - 74 75 76 77
Number: 79
Page 73 of 79