AIR RAIDS & RATION BOOKS: Life on the Home Front


AIR RAIDS & RATION BOOKS: Life on the Home Front

MIKE BROWN & CAROL HARRIS    Book Number: 90087    Product format: Hardback

What was life like for ordinary people during World War II? Our picture of the war tends to be dominated by the heroic sacrifices and doomed love affairs seen in films, but life went on in spite of the bombing and the rationing. This lavishly illustrated book uses pictures and crisply written text to transport the reader into the wartime experience. Gas masks, or the General Civilian Respirator as it was officially called, loomed large and went through several designs, while police and firefighters had more robust versions. A special mask for babies seemed to cover almost the whole body. The blackout was another challenge, with Lancaster Blindcloth adverts telling the houseproud reader "Don't let blackout spoil lovely windows". Brick air raid shelters were constructed for public use, and there were many designs from which you could construct your own, the most famous being the Anderson. Bacon and ham were rationed at 4 oz per week until 1954, while clothes rationing led to the Make-do-and-Mend movement, with shorter hair styles and shorter skirts being the inevitable result of limited resources. Fuel allowances hit domestic heating, and a number of official pamphlets suggested ingenious ways to create a fire, for instance making clay and coal-dust briquettes. When soap was rationed in 1942, new ways of keeping clean were devised, such as making a jelly out of a few soap scraps, or using cold tea to wash your hands. 210pp, photos and reproductions in black and white and colour. A large 20 x 25cm book.
Published price: £20
Bibliophile price: £10.00


Additional product information

ISBN 9780955272363
Browse these categories as well: War Memoirs, Word Books and Dictionaries