BRITAIN'S LOST RAILWAYS:


BRITAIN'S LOST RAILWAYS:

JOHN MINNIS    Book Number: 87238    Product format: Hardback

Slipcased and with 1910 timetable, tickets, railway station architectural plans (now demolished stations) in colour drawings, two Art Nouveau colour posters, a colour national railway map. The famous classical Euston Arch was demolished in 1962 and the author can remember being taken to see it by his teacher, an enthusiast for all things Victorian. Euston station itself also made way for more modern designs, and there are archive photos here of Philip Hardwick's dignified and ornate Great Hall, both in its heyday and finally meeting its end at the hands of the demolition men. Liverpool Street was lucky in being conserved by its developers, but other London stations such as Broad Street with its French Second Empire roof, photographed here partly obscured by a horse-drawn bus, were completely lost. The First Class ladies' waiting room at Victoria, with its dainty wicker furniture and a bell-pull for summoning the waitress, was one of the glories of the old terminus. At Birmingham New Street the footbridge was the hub of the station in 1911, and a ghost of the original remains in the recently developed complex. Wakefield Westgate in 1900 echoed the Italianate style of the town's civic buildings, while Nottingham's Victoria, opened in 1900, was built of Darley Dale stone in the Flemish Renaissance style. Newmarket station, "one of railway architecture's most serious losses", was described as a "Baroque orangery" with its paired Ionic columns. Lost rural stations include Symonds Yat perched on the banks of the Wye, Redmile with its elaborate fireplace displaying the arms of Belvoir Castle, and Walberswick's tiny shelter reminiscent of the bathing huts in nearby Southwold. Boxed with a pocket of facsimiles. 192pp, archive photos on almost every page.
Published price: £25
Bibliophile price: £12.00


Additional product information

ISBN 9781781317198
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