YORKSHIRE: A Lyrical History of England's Greatest County


YORKSHIRE: A Lyrical History of England's Greatest County

RICHARD MORRIS    Book Number: 86678    Product format: Paperback

The first mention of Yorkshire dates to the 1060s when the kingdom of Wessex conquered "Eoferwicscire" after a period of Viking rule. No other English shire contains so many different landforms: caverns, downland, estuaries, marshes, peat bogs and upland heath. Yorkshire's oldest rocks break through to the surface at high points such as Malham and Ingleton, protruding from the limestone that forms an underground network of caverns and potholes, with Gaping Gill pot going down far deeper than the height of York Minster. Gritstone rock between Sheffield and Swaledale characterises the Yorkshire landscape as it exists in the popular imagination - Wesleyan chapels, the Brontë sisters, Compo and his Holmfirth chums. The author, a distinguished archaeologist, describes York with a professional eye: on the one hand the romance of street names like Whip-Ma-Whop-Ma-Gate and Mucky Peg Yard, on the other the eighteen feet of black, spongy dregs between the modern street and the city of Constantine, in which bits of buildings, ash, skin, seeds, cat whiskers and the whole world of human detritus tell a story. Other case histories include the village of Gamsworth, near Bolton Abbey, inspiration for both Wordsworth and Turner, where the Holmes family lived in the same house for three centuries. Cleveland miner Alf Myers grew up in Morris's mother's village and as a conscientious objector in WWI endured physical torture including a commuted death sentence. A wonderful read, packed with detail. 278pp, paperback, maps, colour photos.
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Bibliophile price: £6.00


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ISBN 9781780229096
Browse this category: Great Britain, Maps & the Environment

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