MICHAEL FARADAY AND THE ELECTRICAL CENTURY


MICHAEL FARADAY AND THE ELECTRICAL CENTURY

IWAN RHYS MORUS    Book Number: 83415    Product format: Paperback

Bibliophile Books is lucky enough to have their HQ exactly where Michael Faraday conducted his electrical experiments, at Trinity Buoy Wharf on the River Thames. Faraday is a giant of science history and a pioneer in the study of electricity. Electricity was a revolutionary force of 19th century society and the electric telegraph had made mass communication possible. Inventors looked forward to the day when electricity would control all aspects of life and by the end of the century, this dream was well on its way to being realised. But what was Faraday's role in all this? Here is the story of his upbringing in London and his apprenticeship at the Royal Institution under the supervision of the flamboyant chemist Sir Humphry Davy, all set against the backdrop of a vibrant scientific culture and an empire near the peak of its power. Faraday invented the electric motor, investigated the relationship between electricity and magnetism showing that currents of electricity could be produced by a moving magnet, an insight that lay at the heart of the 19th century electrical power industry. We learn about his lack of formal scientific education, humble background from Yorkshire parents who were followers of the Sandemanians, a small non-conformist sect outside the dominant Church of England. Faraday became an elder of the church and in 1804 aged 13, a bookseller hired him as an errand boy and he became an apprentice to learn the trade of bookbinder and stationer. 228pp in illustrated softback.
Published price: £8.99
Bibliophile price: £4.50


Additional product information

ISBN 9781785782671
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