AN ALTERNATIVE HISTORY OF BRITAIN: The Hundred Years' War


AN ALTERNATIVE HISTORY OF BRITAIN: The Hundred Years' War

TIMOTHY VENNING    Book Number: 87295    Product format: Hardback

Among the many scenarios discussed in this book is what would have happened if the Black Prince had not died prematurely and left the ten year old Richard to inherit Edward III's crown. What would have been the consequences if the French nobility had been left divided by feuding, and thus presented Henry V with a more united resistance? What if Henry V had recovered from the dysentery that killed him at the age of 35, giving time for his son Henry VI to inherit the crowns of France and England? And what if Joan of Arc had not emerged to galvanise French Resistance at Orléans? All the scenarios are discussed within the framework of a deep understanding of the major forces, tensions and trends that shaped British history and the passions on both sides of the channel. Nothing was inevitable. How could one king be the loyal vassal of his potential enemy? If Philip Augustus of France had reconquered Aquitaine as well as Normandy or Anjou, or the 1259 Treaty between Louis IX and Henry III had made the latter fully sovereign in Aquitaine, would there have been less warfare? In the complex mid-medieval world of a pan-European, French-speaking culture in which the English Kings and nobility were part, the post-1066 English kings were in fact Dukes of Normandy who had gained England by conquest. Their politico-cultural orientation was French. The vagaries of the Norman dynasty's succession had seen England and Normandy pass to the son of Henry I's daughter, Matilda's by Count Geoffrey of Anjou, Henry II. Henry added his wife Eleanor's Aquitaine to his huge melange of polities, and was more powerful in France than its king, his overlord. The so-called 'Plantagenet' dynasty was as much French as English, and until the mid 14th century rarely spoke English. Abandoning its European role after losing Normandy/Anjou in 1204 to concentrate on conquering the British Isle was never a likely option, with a succession of foreign wives and additional incentive. Salic Law, the ban on a female inheriting or transmitting a claim to France, was not actually stated in 1328, and only appears later in the century. The marriage of Edward II to Isabella of France in 1308 and their son Edward III's resultant claim to the French throne after his three brothers died without surviving sons (1316-28) was the seeming reason for the post-1337 English wars in France. 228pp, maps.
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ISBN 9781781591260
Browse these categories as well: War & Militaria, History

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